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China is not ready to establish control over Taiwan by military means – expert

According to expert Yuri Poita, the United States and China are not yet interested in the transition of the crisis into a real military conflict.

The aggravation of the conflict between the US and China over Taiwan is growing / photo ua.depositphotos.com

China is not ready to take control of Taiwan by military means.

Yury Poita, head of the Asia-Pacific region section of the New Geopolitics Research Network, said this in broadcast of the telethon.

“I think that the likelihood (of a direct clash – UNIAN) is increasing. Because we are seeing the rhetoric of China’s top leadership that China will not sit idly by and will even be ready to use force and a liberation army to protect its interests,” he said .

Poita believes that China is not ready to take control of Taiwan militarily. According to the expert, China needs at least five years to prepare for this.

“I don’t think that now there is an irreversible trend to aggravate the situation. Because both sides – both the United States and China – are not yet interested in turning this crisis into a real military conflict,” he said.

Poita admits that in the event of a direct military conflict, China may turn to Russia for help. This, in turn, will enable the latter to also ask for military assistance from China.

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As UNIAN reported earlier, on May 23, US President Joe Biden announced his readiness to use armed forces to defend Taiwan in the event of a Chinese attack.

A week later, dozens of Chinese aircraft entered Taiwan’s air defense zone, but there was no armed clash.

On June 10, US and Chinese Defense Ministers Lloyd Austin and Wei Fenghe met in Singapore. After the talks, the PRC Ministry of Defense stated that Beijing was ready to enter the war if attempts were made to make Taiwan independent. At the same time, the conversation between the ministers in China was described as “frank”, “positive and constructive”.

In mid-June, Chinese leader Xi Jinping signed a decree allowing the “non-military” use of the armed forces. This raised concerns about a potential Chinese invasion of Taiwan under the guise of a “special operation” without a declaration of war.

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